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5 Things To Hate About Web Design (and how to fix them)

hateHateWhat do you hate most about websites? If you browse websites as much as we do, then there is a lot to hate. Because there are so many terribly designed, user non-friendly websites on the Internet today, we have put together this short but detailed list of things to hate about web design. In addition to compiling this list, we’ve also provided a solution for each of the problems.

When creating a web design, there are a number of things that a web designer should take into consideration if their goal is to produce a high quality, user friendly website.

vomiting manVomiting Man1. Vomit Inducing Color Schemes

There is nothing worse than visiting a website and seeing a borderline-gruesome, mismatched, out of control color scheme. As basic as it is, some people have a terrible time choosing successful color schemes. Though there are millions of colors to choose from, it doesn’t have to be a difficult process. Whether you want to pay for a piece of software that will significantly simplify the color scheme selection process or use one of the free color scheme tools available on the Internet, you will be implementing attractive and successful color schemes in no time.

To Pay

If you want to pay for a color scheme application that will do all of the work for you, then your best solution is the Color Schemer Studio. Located at http://www.colorschemer.com and available in both Mac OS X and Windows flavors, this tool not only builds you an entire color scheme based on a single color, but it also generates monochromatic, complement, split complement, triad, tetrad, and analogous harmonies based off of that same single color that you choose. It is absolutely remarkable. There are a lot of other neat and extremely useful features built into this application, too.

colorschemer studioColorschemer Studio Not to Pay

If you would rather not pay the $49.99 for the Color Schemer Studio (even though it is worth every penny), then there are free alternatives available. Navigate to http://www.colorsontheweb.comand you will find a Flash based color scheme tool called the Color Wizard. Although not quite as user friendly as the Color Schemer Studio, the Color Wizard has a lot of features built into it. You can either enter a hex color code or move the sliders back and forth to find the color that you’re looking for. The Color Wizard also gives you multiple harmonies based off of the single color that you choose. The Color Wizard is a solid (and free) color schemer product. The only downside to the Color Wizard is that it is available only to be used on the Internet. In comparison, the Color Schemer Studio does not require an Internet connection since it is located on your computer’s hard drive.

Less is More

When choosing your color scheme, don’t use too many colors. The statement “less is more” should always be applied during the color scheme selection process. How many colors should one use? Thats a difficult question to answer. Although there is no set number, it is generally best to work around three colors if possible:

  • Primary color: The main color that occupies the majority of the page. The primary color sets the overall tone.
  • Secondary color: The second color that has a purpose of backing up and reinforcing the primary color. The secondary color is usually a color that is similar to the primary color.
  • Highlight color: This is a color that is used to emphasize certain areas of the page. It is usually a color which contrasts more with the primary and secondary colors, and as such, it should be used with moderation. If you’re using color schemer software like the ones mentioned above, it is common to use a complimentary or split-complimentary color for this.

There are a lot of resources available on the Internet that explain color schemes in greater detail. However, if you use any of the color schemer solutions mentioned above and follow the basic tips which we have mentioned, then you shouldn’t have a problem creating a beautiful color scheme for your website.

2. Flash Abuse

When used excessively or in inappropriate places, Flash is terrible for your website - terrible for Search Engine Optimization and perhaps more importantly, terrible for your visitors. Don’t get us wrong - Flash is a remarkable program that allows creative multimedia geniuses to produce some fascinating work. However, the following implementations of Flash should be excluded from your website:

flash website navigation elementsFlash Website NavigationNavigation

Probably the most abused and misused method of using Flash, Flash navigation is usually bad or extremely bad. Why is it bad you ask? Well, there are a number of reasons:

  • Search Engine Optimization: If you’re familiar with SEO, then you know the importance of having text on your website. Text is what makes indexing your website in the search engines possible. The problem with Flash is that the search engines do not go inside of the Flash files to collect the text information. What this basically means is that when the search engine spiders crawl through your website and come across your Flash navigation file, they crawl right over the top of it. If you have keywords in your Flash navigation that are relevant to the content of your website, then they won’t be indexed or even noticed by the search engine spiders.
  • Page load time: Using Flash for your navigation will slow down the load time for your web page. Yes, using anything on your website will add to the load time; however, some things (such as Flash navigation) are avoidable. Some Flash file sizes are larger than others - the larger the file size means a longer download time means the more your already impatient visitors have to wait.
  • User non-friendly: The purpose of website navigation is to provide for your visitors a means of, well, navigating throughout your website. Flash navigation crosses over from bad to extremely bad when the visitor must wait for an animation to complete each time their mouse cursor rolls over an item in the menu. In case you didn’t already know, people hate waiting. There is nothing worse than having to wait even just a few seconds in order to activate a particular navigational item after rolling over it. Not only can the animations be annoying, but sometimes the menus are just downright confusing (i.e. Picture elements are used instead of words for each item).
  • What about people who don’t have Flash?: Not everyone is using Flash these days. Although it is usually rare that someone doesn’t have Flash activated on their computer, it still occurs. These Flash-disabled users will have no way of finding their way around your website. And since one of the key ingredients to a successful website is navigation, not having navigation to those with Flash disabled will make your website look quite terrible (and more importantly, non-interactive and useless).

The best way to build a SEO friendly, fast loading, user friendly, ultra compatible navigational menu is by using CSS (cascading style sheets). CSS solves all of these problems that you will encounter when using Flash navigation. There a number of free CSS navigational menu resources available on the Internet. Dynamic Drive CSS based navigational menus located at dynamicdrive.com are extremely popular and widely used by web designers and web developers, including us.

flash introFlash IntroFlash Intros

Without a doubt the worst way to use (or should we say misuse) Flash is to have a Flash intro on your website. In case you don’t already know, Flash intros are those annoying animations that play when you first arrive at some websites. If the content of your website is engaging and useful, then there is no real reason to have a Flash intro. Adding to the fact that most people are impatient when surfing the web, many of them do not have the time or patience to watch a lengthy Flash intro.

If you’re going to have a Flash intro, then at least include a “Skip Intro” button that is clearly visible to the user. Even better, instead of making the Flash intro something that is automatically shown to all visitors, place a descriptive link somewhere inside of your website that, when clicked, allows the user to view your promotional animation (usually what Flash intros are).

Finally, be careful with the inclusion of sound in your Flash intro. If someone has their speakers turned up to a high volume, then you could be responsible for scaring the living daylights out of them (and scaring them away from your website as well).

information overloadInformation Overload3. Information Overload

Having too little information on pages of your website can make them seem bare and boring; however, having too much information can overwhelm the user (which isn’t something you particularly want to do). Ads, images, text, more ads, navigation, secondary navigation, content, more ads… they all start to add up.

Although there is no rule as to how much information per web page is enough, you should try and limit your web pages to the following:

  • Header/logo: All websites need a header/logo to identify who they are. For usability purposes, try and keep the height of your header at a moderate size. Most of our headers are no more than 200 - 300 pixels tall. Anything taller than 300 pixels and you take the risk of forcing the user to have to scroll down just to see the navigation and content of your website. Yes, we want the user to look at the navigation and content of your website; however, less scrolling makes for an easier and more enjoyable visit for the user.
  • Navigation: All websites must have a functional navigational system in order for users to be able to find their way around the website. Using vertical or horizontal menus are a matter of personal preference. Although one menu is necessary, try not to have more than one. Multiple navigational menus can easily confuse the user. If you have a lot of sections on your website, then try using a CSS drop down menu which will allow you to include a great deal of navigational items while taking up a minimal amount of space.
  • Ads: Many websites provide a service to their visitors for free. It is because of advertisements that most of these services are available for free. When using advertisements, don’t abuse their usage. Google AdSense allows a maximum of 3 ads per web page for a reason - too many ads can make your web site look like spam in no time. Placement of advertisements is also important. Don’t try to trick your visitors by placing your ads in areas where they look like actual content on your web site. People do not like to be tricked. If they want to visit your advertising sponsor, then they will click on the ad.
  • Content: Each web page should have an area for content. This main section should be the focal point for each web page. Having a lot of information about the topic for each web page is absolutely fine. Make sure not to include too many different topics on one web page. Instead, split the topics up and allow for each to have its own page.
  • Images: Use images moderately and only when necessary in your content area. Images take longer to download than text. Make sure that your images are properly compressed so that the download time for your web pages are not compromised due to large images. Nothing says “amateur web designer” more than having large, uncompressed images that take minutes to load.
  • Footer: The information contained in footers vary from website to website. Try not to stuff too much information in the footer - especially important information. Not all users scroll down to the bottom of web pages to see the footer - some stop at the end of the content. If you have important information that must be placed inside of the footer, then begin the footer soon after the content area ends. Placing the main links for your website in the footer is a practice commonly used by designers.

There may be additional things that a website requires depending on the topic and the industry; however, all websites should contain these 6 elements. Developing a navigation and layout strategy before building a website is essential in guaranteeing that your website doesn’t suffer from information overload.

text inside imageText Inside Image4. Image Text: A Big No No

Like a car inside of an airplane hanger, text does not belong inside of an image. The only exception to this should be using text inside of a logo. Yes, it can be boring using the same text that everyone else uses for their websites. However, you can still make rich and compelling designs without sticking fancy text inside of your images.

There are a few reasons why using text inside of images is a no-no:

  • Larger image file sizes: Each piece of information inside of an image adds size to the file. As we mentioned earlier, the larger the file size means a longer download time means the more your already impatient visitors have to wait.
  • Not SEO friendly: Just like Flash files, search engine spiders cannot detect the textual information inside of image files.

If you have an image that requires text, then try an alternative method using CSS layers. Not only is this method easy to implement, but it will help keep the image file size smaller. It is also SEO friendly.

too many columnsToo Many Columns5. Attack of the Columns

No, this isn’t a spin off of the Star Wars movie. Attack of the Columns is a phrase we use when a web designer uses more than a few columns in their layout. Some designers believe that by using more than a few columns they can better organize and display the information on their web page. The problem is, just like information overload, using too many columns will overwhelm the user.

When more than 2 or 3 columns are used, a focal point is usually eliminated from the web page. Without a focal point, the user has no idea where to look. Instead, the user’s eyes wander aimlessly throughout the web page. This will cause the user to feel confused and overwhelmed and might make them go to a similar website with a cleaner, less-busy layout.

Even if there is a focal point, there is probably going to be too much information on a 4+ column layout. If huge sites with massive amounts of content (i.e. Amazon.com) are able to work with a 3 column layout, then there is no reason that any other website can’t do the same. Plan your layout before you start building your website and you will find that even if you have a lot information and content, a 3 column layout is more than enough.

all smilesAll SmilesHappier Visitors

These 5 Things to Hate About Web Design are very important - perhaps the most important things a web designer should take into consideration when building a website. All 5 of these items have one thing in common: when followed, the user will have an easy, fast loading, straight forward experience when they visit your website. What more could they ask for? Well, maybe less advertising.

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Traffic Demographics

Website TrafficWebsite TrafficHow much do you know about the visitors to your web site? Are they directly interested in what you have to offer them? Is what you are speaking about on your site general information that is available anywhere on the internet, or something that they can only get from you? If you are simply rehashing what everybody else is saying, then you are losing out on a lot of traffic, and a lot of income.

Exactly how much you need to know remains something of a mystery. However, it is relatively safe to say that if you offer only generalities on your web page, you may generate a lot of traffic but you will probably not get a lot of return visitors. While people who come to your site initially, may provide some base ad revenue, unless they can interact on your site, they are probably not going to be very receptive to actual sales pitches from you.

HealthCareHealth CareFor example, if you are involved in the health care niche, and you only put out a couple of hundred articles about how important health care is, without giving your visitors and readers any real or useful information, it is not likely that they will be returning to get any real information from your site. When you offer them something of substance, no matter whether it is a digital product, or something more tangible, they will remember your mediocrity, and not be compelled to purchase your offerings.

On the other hand, if you have fifty well-written articles, discussing the different types of health care, and different concerns, benefits, and hazards of specific health care needs, your visitors will be more likely to return. When you have something specific to offer those readers, they are bound to be more responsive to your offers.

You can have ten thousand people on your list regarding your particular niche, but are you taking all of the possible variations into consideration, in order to offer something that is directly relevant to your list? That is not to say that you have to get into too much detail, but that you do need to offer them something that is directly related to a specific need. If there is no specific need to fill, none of your visitors will feel a need to purchase it.

While you do not want to narrow your niche down so far that you no longer have any real audience at all, you do want to include specifics about as many of those subgroups in your niche as is possible. Concentrate on building them up one at a time and you will actually fare much better than you would by bombarding them with everything all at once.

health care nichesHealth Care NichesIf you return to our health care niche example, you could very well start off with a general site, stating the relevance of health care, and how important it is for everyone. That main heading can then be broken down into sub-categories, in order to meet and fulfill the needs and requirements of all of the people that visit your site.

The health care needs of a professional athlete are going to be different than the needs of an elderly and infirm person. However, by including sections in your site to cover the needs of both of those groups, you have expanded your audience by providing more specifics separated into different areas. You have also accomplished this without alienating either group. This is something that is very relevant when you want to generate return traffic or confidence in the products you have for sale on your site.

Whatever particular niche yours happens to be, try expanding it as far as possible while continuing to provide enough information for the casual reader to learn what category they belong in. Offering something for both the general audience as well as more specific information for each of the groups within that arena will only expand your audience, your credibility and your income.

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Web design: Keep it clean

less is moreLess is MoreWhen designing your website, remember one thing: Less is more. Some people make the mistake of filling up every pixel on their web page with a different image or graphic or piece of text. Not only does this usually look bad, but it greatly diminishes the chance that the visitor will be able to find a focal point. People don’t like being confused when they visit a web site. They like simple.

column structureColumn StructureInformation overload

Try to not use more than three columns in your layout. Some websites can get away with one column, others need two or three. A good web designer will be able to develop a strategy for successfully laying out their website content in only a few columns.

Colors that complement

Try to avoid using more than 5 colors on your website. Develop a color scheme and stick to it. A great site that has heaps of working color schemes is at http://www.colorschemer.com. They also have a program called ColorSchemer that makes choosing colors a cinch. No, we don’t work for these guys - we just love their website and software! One of their recent blog posts was about our company’s obvious favorite color - blue!

Content is king

Make sure that the content on your pages is informative and to the point. Many web surfers have short attention spans and will lose interest if your web page content isn’t concise and clear. On the other hand, if you have a lot of informative, valuable information, post as much of it as you can. The web needs a lot of good content to make up for all of the bad website content out there.

too many imagesToo Many ImagesUse images wisely

The same can be said for website images - don’t abuse them. Not only do too many images look tacky and unprofessional, but they can significantly slow down the loading of your website. As mentioned a moment ago, web surfers have short attention spans. If your website takes longer than 5-10 seconds to load, you risk losing visitors. Make sure that your images have been optimized in Adobe Photoshop or other image editing software. Optimized images will load much more quickly than images that are saved without any optimization.

Web pages that suck

Web design talent is not something everyone has been gifted with. Someone went so far as to prove this fact by creating a website called Web Pages That Suck.com. On this site you will find many examples of, forgive us for saying, terrible websites. Those who created these sites obviously did not read their Web Design 101 book. We actually found this site helpful, when many of us at Chromatic Sites first began our website design careers. You can learn a lot from other people’s mistakes. Try your best not to end up on that website.

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Web Design - Simple Mistakes and Golden Rules

Good Web DesignGood Web DesignGood web design is something that can be achieved relatively easily by sticking to a small set of guiding principles and avoiding some very common mistakes.

Truly excellent web design skills are born out of years of experience, dedication, and plenty of hard-learned mistakes. Fortunately, being truly excellent at web design is not a pre-requisite for building a fantastic website, and the lessons learned from those mistakes can be passed on without the hardship.

This article contains some of the principles which I have learned the hard way, and the easy way. Each principle is fairly obvious, but so many designers ignore them for one reason or another, and the consequence is a hard-to-use, poor looking site that is difficult to manage, and fails to make the top 1000 in Google. If your website adheres to the principles below, it will almost certainly be much healthier, and you, and your visitors will reap the benefits.

1. Keep Everything Obvious - Don't Make Me Think

The book entitled Don't Make Me Think!: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability by Steve Krug, is one of the best selling books on the subject of web design and usability. Personally, I think thinking is a good thing, but at the same time, I don't want to be struggling to figure out how to submit a web form!

Visitors to a website expect certain conventions, breaking these is a great way of losing visitors. People expect to find the navigation at the top of a page, or on the left hand side. Logos are mostly found on the top left. Much research has been conducted into how people view and use web pages. The good news is that you do not need to know all of this; instead, look at how larger companies, such as eBay, Amazon, Google, and Microsoft structure their pages, and the language they use, then emulate them.

website colourswebsite colours2. Limit Colours

A website using too many colours at a time can be overwhelming to many users, and can make a website look cheap and tacky. Any users with colour blindness, or contrast perception difficulties, may even be unable to use the site.

Limiting a palette to 2 or 3 colours, will nearly always lead to a slicker looking design, and has the added bonus of simplifying your design choices, reducing design time.

Software like Color Wheel Pro, can greatly simplify the creation of a pallet, by showing which colours sit well together. If you really do not have the eye for design, then software like this provides the perfect way of escaping monotone, or badly combined colour schemes.

If your site uses blue and yellow together, or red and green, then it may present problems to anyone suffering with colour blindness. Vischeck.com provide free software that can simulate different types of colour blindness.

Web fontsWeb Fonts3. Be Careful With Fonts

The set of fonts available to all visitors of a website is relatively limited. Add to that the possibility of a user having a visual impairment, then the options become even smaller. It is advisable to stick to fonts such as Arial, Verdana, Courier, Times, Geneva and Georgia. They may not be very interesting but your content should be more interesting than your font, and if it can't be read, what is the point of having a site?

Black text on a white background, is far easier for the majority of people to read, than white text on a black background. If you have large amounts of text, then a white or pale background is far more user friendly. Always ensure that there is a good contrast between any text and its background. Blue text on a blue background is okay, as long as the difference in shade is significant.

Verdana is often cited as being the easiest to read on the screen. Georgia is probably the best option for a serif font.

web design developmentWeb Design and Development4. Plan for Change

If you fix the height of your page to 600 pixels, will you still be able to add additional menu items, without completely redesigning your page?

The ability to add or remove content from a website is fundamental to the ongoing success of it. Having to rewrite the entire web page, or website, each time you want to make a small change, is a sure fire way to kill your interest in your own site, and will negatively impact your overall design and usability.

Getting a good idea of how your website is likely to grow, will clarify how best to structure your layout. For example, a horizontal navigation is often more restrictive than a side navigation, unless you use drop down menus; if your navigation is likely to grow, and you hate drop down menus, then your design choice has been 99% made for you!

Understanding how to use Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), avoiding unconventional layouts, and complicated backgrounds, will all help enormously.

5. Be Consistent

Again, don't make your visitors think! About how to use your site, at least. If your navigation is at the top on your homepage, it should be at the top on all other pages too. If your links are coloured red, ensure the the same convention is used on all sections.

By using CSS correctly, you can make most of this happen automatically, leaving you free to concentrate on the content.

holiday picturesNon Relevant Holiday Pictures6. Keep it Relevant

A picture is better than a thousand words, but if the picture you took on holiday is not relevant to your Used Car Sales website, then you should really replace it with something which reflects the content or mood of the page; a photo of a car perhaps!

If you can take something off of your web page without it adversely affecting the message, appearance or legality of your website, you should do it without hesitation.

Avoid the need to add images, Flash animations or adverts, just because you have space. This wastes bandwidth, and obscures the intentions of your website. If you absolutely must fill the space, then exercise your imagination to find something as relevant as possible.

Keeping your content focused will ultimately help your search-engine rankings

cascading style sheetsCSS-Cascading Style Sheets7. Become a CSS Expert

Cascading Style Sheets should be any web designer's best friend. CSS makes it possible to separate the appearance, and layout of your page, from the content. This has huge benefits when it comes to updating and maintaining your site, making your site accessible, and making your site easy for search engines to read.

CSS at a first glance is very straightforward but it is definitely worth investing in one, or more books. Two great books are: CSS the Missing Manual by David McFarland and Bulletproof Web Design by Dan Cederholm.

8. Avoid Complexity

Using standard layouts for your web page will save you development time, and make your site easier to use. Pushing the boundaries nearly always leads to quirky behaviour, cross-browser problems, confused site visitors, and maintenance headaches. Unless you really do like a challenge, then avoid complexity wherever possible.

Many standard layouts are freely available online with much of the boring, repetitive work already done for you.

The principles above all border on common sense, and are well known to most people, yet so many sites continue to deviate away from them, and suffer as a consequence. Following these principles will help you keep away from trouble, although it still doesn't guarantee it!

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Your Company's Web Site – Quality Approach

team plannning a websiteTeam Planning a WebsiteThis is the second segment of a three-part series that addresses the guidelines on how to plan, present and develop your company’s website. In part one; we explored the importance of having a professional website that represents your company online. In part two; we will identify the quality approach of planning your company’s website.

Designing and developing a quality website. When you hire a team to create or redesign your company’s website, keep in mind that the basic concepts of quality also apply. They are:

Continuous Improvement

Leave space to grow, and make what is good now, even better. Your company will improve through the years, and so should your website, but this does not mean you need a new design every year! Leave room for improvement; build a quality website that can be easily updated to reflect the changes in your company.

Value of Quality

A well-designed and developed website does not cost; it pays! This is an investment that will bring you return in the form of satisfied clients. On the other hand, the cost of a poorly developed website can be a price that most companies pay for unknowingly – that is the price of non-quality. If your company’s website reflects the high standards of your company, it will bring you more clients; however, if your company’s website does not mirror the image you are trying to build, it will drive visitors and potential clients away.

How to Build an Engaged Audience for Your WebsiteBuild an Engaged Audience for Your WebsiteVisitor Satisfaction

Nothing is worse than getting lost within in a poor quality website, or being on a site and unable to find the information you need. Or when text is difficult to read because of site colour combinations. Have you ever been frustrated after clicking on a link and finding that the page no longer exists?

These and other website issues reflect on your company’s image. If a website is not well built, it sends the message that your company is not well structured; if your website has dead ends, it suggests that your company is not well managed.

Raise the bar – provide a well-structured and well managed, quality website, and exceed your client’s expectations.

Problem Solving

A quality website must anticipate the needs of the visitor. Since a company representative is unavailable to deal with any prospective problems that may occur while a visitor is browsing your site, plan ahead and crosscheck all possible scenarios. Let’s translate this into Quality terms:

1. Define the problem: Make a list of potential problems users may experience when browsing your website. This will maximize the solutions and keep a quality focus.

2. Generate alternative solutions: Once potential problems have been identified, make a list of possible solutions that deal with each problem. Implement this procedure to ensure that your visitors have an enjoyable visit to your site.

find a solutionFind a Solution3. Evaluate and select alternatives: Choose a solution that is right for your website, to ensure that your target audience will know what to expect, should a problem arise, and how to use the feature you provided. It is unhelpful if the solutions you provide are causing a visitor more problems. Example: Your Company manufactures hardware and a website visitor would like a copy of your catalogue; you provide an online form for visitors to complete in order to receive the catalogue in the mail. Sufficient? Not really. It may take a week for that catalogue to reach your prospective client. Consider providing visitors with a version of the catalogue online that can either be printed or downloaded as a PDF.

4. Implement and follow up on the solution: Simply adding solutions will not fix the problem; you must ensure that each solution works. For example, if you request an online form to be completed in order to download the above-mentioned PDF catalogue, how can you be certain people are actually submitting the form? Are they finding it easy to complete? Are they hitting the “Submit” button and downloading the catalogue in PDF format? This is where “follow up” becomes important. But how can a company follow up if website visitors never submitted the form that would have allowed for an easy follow up in the first place? You (or your webmaster or Search Engine Optimization (SEO) consultant) should monitor the stats of your website and compare how many visitors your form page had, against the visitors your PDF catalogue page had. If you have 70% less visitors on your PDF catalogue page than on your form page, this would suggest a problem that has not been thoroughly solved.

planning a website designPlanning a Website DesignPlanning for the Future

Plan your website to grow with your company. When a facility is built to house a company for 10 years, plans include a good-sized parking lot, ideal kitchen facilities, more than one washroom, several plugs for countless electronic devices, etc. The same rings true for your website– it should be built to evolve. As products and services develop, or contact information changes, your website changes too. Build to grow!

Quality Website -- Quality Assurance and Quality Control

A website design company should ensure that a website will be built to the complete satisfaction of the client (you), and be customized to that client’s needs. Make sure your website is functional and user friendly, and that usability testing takes place. Usability testing is a form of website quality control, and it ensures that your site is visible by different types of browsers and that visitors will not get lost.

properly designed for all appsProperly Designed for All AppsSupplier Quality

Finally, a website design company must provide good service and a custom product that matches all your needs. This does not have to cost a fortune, nor does the company requesting a new or redesigned website need to be a large one. Ask questions before committing to a design team; make sure they understand your needs. Check their portfolio and references. Nothing speaks louder than current clients who are satisfied with the results of their new website.

Summary: Planning a quality website and seeking the company that will undertake its creation, is a major step in promoting your company, and the products and services you offer. The same care you take in planning the growth of your company, and the quality provided by the products and/or services you offer should be transmitted in a professional, well-planned website. List your priorities. Search for a good design company. Discuss your company needs, products and services. Plan for the future.

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